Posted filed under Roofing Kansas City, Roofing News.

Larry Vaught Roofing

Municipalities are adopting new city ordinances to more strictly regulate the activities of contractors working within their communities.  There may be good reason for implementing stricter regulations.  However, new city ordinances will inevitably end up costing residents significantly more as contractors comply with those stricter regulations.  In some instances, contractors may even choose not to offer their services in communities where they risk incurring hefty fines for failing to fully comply with these new city ordinances.

To follow are just a few examples of new city ordinances being considered or adopted that add significantly to the cost of completing home improvement projects:

  • Limiting the number of construction vehicles allowed at a job site
  • Requiring placards be placed in windows of contractor’s vehicles to validate each vehicle has authorization to be parked in the neighborhood
  • Privatizing streets so workers must be shuttled to the work site.
  • Requiring installation of protective / temporary fencing around trees along roadways during construction related activities.  The premise is that fencing will protect trees by preventing workers, materials, tools, and equipment from being able to travel beneath the drip line of these trees.  It will also likely limit access to the job site.

City ordinances could impact your next roofing project

City Ordinances may affect your next roofing project

Materials loaded on to roof                                                      

 

When time to repair or replace your roof, will city ordinances limit the number of vehicles a contractor can have at your job site?  Will the contractor be required to have placards placed in each company vehicle and employee vehicle before those vehicles will be allowed to park near the job site?  Will the contractor be required to install temporary protective fencing around trees along the roadway?  How much are the fines a contractor may incur for failing to fully comply with each of the restrictive city ordinances?

We were actually at a customer’s home a few weeks ago to perform about $300 of roof repairs when a building codes administration official stopped to inform our repairman that he was in violation of a recently passed city ordinance which requires contractors to install a temporary protective fence around the tree our repairman had just walked under with his ladder.  Since he failed to do so, the Codes Administration Official told our repairman that he could fine him (a.k.a. Larry Vaught Roofing) ~$1,500.00 (i.e. $100 per 1-inch diameter of each tree that he failed to protect). Thankfully, we simply received a warning in this instance.  But, it has caused us to seriously consider whether or not to continue offering our services in that municipality due to the risk of incurring very costly fines for failing to fully comply with this municipality’s new restrictive ordinances.  Regardless, the simple facts are: as municipalities adopt more restrictive city ordinances, we will absolutely be forced to increase our prices to meet those new ordinances.

 

 

We’ve got the credentials you’d expect of a contractor that complies with city ordinances and building codes:

  • GAF Certified Master Elite® Roofing Contractor.  Only 3% of all roofing contractors qualify as GAF Master Elite® contractors!
  • Certainteed certified Shingle Master. Certainteed offers a number of programs for roofing contractors who want to take their business to the next level.  Collectively, they call them the contractor’s EDGE. These programs are designed to promote the highest standards of excellence in the roofing industry.
  • Haag Certified Roof Inspector on staff.
    (Dan Whitfield HCRI-R).
  • Angie’s List 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 Super Service Award recipient.
  • Regularly listed as an Angie’s List Honor Roll recipient.
  • And, we are a member of the Better Business Bureau since 1975 with an A+ accredited rating.
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